Moving to a high seeding rate increased DM and TDN yields and decreased CP and P concentrations in forage corn.  Using a high nitrogen fertilizer rate increased yields of DM, TDN and CP, increased soluble protein concentration, and reduced P concentration.  However, when net returns...

Low plant density, split nitrogen, and PGR application all showed potential to reduce lodging risk without reducing grain yield or protein concentration. Today’s high yielding spring wheat varieties bring with them the potential for lodging under high nitrogen inputs. The objectives of this study were to...

Using fungicide and a high nitrogen (N) rate most consistently increased flax yield (11% increase). The combination of high plant density, narrow row spacing, high N fertilizer, and fungicide produced the highest yield response (23% more), but not in unfavorable growing environments. The most well-rounded...

Under  irrigated and high-precipitation conditions, canola yield from 12 inch narrow-row precision planted canola was 10% higher than canola seeded with a 12 inch row air drill. However, under more water-limited conditions, yield from air drill seeded canola was equal or higher than the precision...

A meta-analysis of canola yield response to plant densities found that the economic optimal canola plant stand is 6 to 7 plants per square foot assuming recent 3 year average hybrid seed cost of $11.84/lbs., and farmgate canola price of $10.22/bu, hybrid seed size of...

For this study conducted in southern Alberta on irrigated and dryland plots, the precision planter with 12 inch spacing increased seedling emergence and plant stand density compared to an air drill on 12-inch spacing or precision planter with 20 inch spacing — as long as...

Seed wheat as soon as feasible after soil temperatures reach 0C, and prior to soils reaching 7.5–10C, with an optimal seeding rate of 40 seeds/ft2, and at a shallow seeding depth. Ultra-early seeded wheat increased grain yield and stability compared to current seeding practices. Using...

Wider row spacing in wheat is possible – up to 16 inches – but producers need to monitor their plant density to ensure they are reaching an adequate stand establishment to achieve optimum yield, especially since all seeding equipment may not maintain separation of seed...